Meingast – A Collector of Objects

A curious fact often overlooked by his biographers (but well-known among his contemporaries) was the delectation Meingast took in objects as such. This fervent appreciation of objects as such survived his shift from the naïve realism of his youth to the “infinite mirror realism” of his maturity, the doctrine of transcendental reality mirrored ad infinitum […]

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The Elixir of Sunbeams

An entry on Meingast was written for the 1923 edition of the Grundriß der Geschichte der Philosophie (Schwabe & Co Verlag), but Meingast’s attorney wrote a short letter demanding that it not be included because Meingast did not want “to erect his tombstone quite yet.” The publisher wasn’t able to supply a draft of the […]

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On Breakfast Cereals

A. L. Katz devotes some pages to an enigmatic, hastily scrawled remark in Meingast’s diary dated July 13, 1902:   “Müsl, Müsl, wie du mein Wesen verhedderst!”   After much deliberation and wringing of hands, Katz ascribes the umlaut to agitation, and renders the remark,  “Musil, Musil, how you misunderstand my nature!” –  a reflection, he […]

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Pets

By all accounts, Meingast was fond of animals. In 1910 or 1911, he adopted two kittens. Dr. Marie de Besombes (a librarian at the BNF) thinks there’s a good chance that the curious cats in this photo are Meingast’s cats Hamilcar and Hasdrubal. de Besombes also said that Meingast had some pet roosters as a teenager (he kept them […]

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Maria von Klemperer II

The union  (he would have hated that word, of course) between Adalbert and Maria was short-lived because Maria herself was short-lived: she intentionally overdosed on opiates imported from Bucharest, leaving open a copy of Die Leiden des jungen Werthers next to her bed. This has led scholars to wonder whether there was another woman in Meingast’s life […]

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Meingast’s Routine

I found an excerpt written by Alexandr (Shurik) Leonidovich Katz describing Meingast’s daily life in Graz: “Teaching obliga­tions claimed two to three hours a day, in which was included the lecture on classical pedagogy that he held twice weekly at the university. His remaining work hours were reserved for reading, the setting down on paper of […]

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Maria von Klemperer

He courted her in the cruelly hot summer of 1867 when he was stationed outside Linz. From a youthful diary entry: “She wanted to be expressive, yes, but her cheeks, surging with ever more pliant flesh as she lumberingly metamorphosed into what every lady of the Bildungsbürgertum must eventually become (immovable), made even wrath (she hated it when I forgot […]

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